Lesson: Animal Health And Safety

Lesson: Animal Health And Safety

Lesson: Animal Health And Safety
Animal and Humans

In this lesson: Animal health and safety we discuss the basic requirements and principles of vet tech and sanitation. Animals and humans have very specific requirements to maintain health and viability. We will discuss the rules and tips and tricks to staying and keeping health and viability.

Students need a basic introduction to pathogens and toxicological realities of working with animals. In this lesson we introduce the realities of animal heath, living condition, wastes, and pathologies. Specific care and management strategies are taught and observed by students to protect BOTH animals and humans.

This lesson is optimized for Mezzacello, as it is an urban farm, but it can work in any environment where humans and animals interact, including at home.

Materials

  • Cages
  • Animals
  • Sanitation Equipment
  • Water Access
  • Gloves
  • Goggles
  • Detailed instruction sets
  • Lab coats

Instructions

  1. Introduce students to the habitation centers for the animals
  2. Highlight features for sanitation, safety, and comfort
  3. Allow students to experience first hand what the realities of animal keeping are
  4. Share with students the five most dangerous pathologies associated with animal/human interaction
  5. Ask students to brainstorm ways to avoid coming in contact with those pathogens
  6. Share their ideas and allow them to come up with creative alternatives
  7. Share the truth and the law
  8. Ask the students to find creative, responsible and safe ways to keep their ideas and their friends and animals safe
  9. Put together a teen-human’s guide to keeping animals
  10. Ask students to take a series of photos demonstrating safe and responsible animal handling practices
  11. Ask students to take a photo in a lab coat looking like what they think a vet would look like

Lesson: Animal Evolution Body Puzzle

Lesson: Animal Evolution Body Puzzle

Lesson: Animal Health and Safety Puzzle
Parts of the Chicken Species

In this lesson: Animal evolution body puzzle students must determine what makes three different species of animals similar and what they share in common. This will be done in teams where each team will be given five minutes to observe an animal species and make five key observations about that animal. Then they will report out and shift to the next.

When the rotations are complete, each team will write on the board their observations. Then as a whole the class will identify the most common traits and observations and those that are unique to that animal. This is a great introduction to taxonomy and observation skills tied to real world experience.

Materials

  • Cages
  • Animals
  • Notepad
  • Pencils or pens
  • White board
  • Dry erase markers
  • Whiteboard microfiber cloth
  • Construction paper
  • Scissors
  • Animal Part Templates (if you want)

Instructions

  1. Assemble three different animal species in cages
    1. The more diverse the species the better
    2. Having the ability to touch the animals is a plus, but not necessary to success
    3. Forbid any observation that is not generalizable
    4. Humans can be one of the animals
    5. Insect species are a crazy alternative, but touching is a plus
  2. Assign students to one of the three animal species
  3. Ask them to make five observations in three minutes (time them)
  4. Rotate them through three times
  5. Reassemble the students to discuss
  6. On a white board label the three species as a row
  7. Have the students list their observations under each heading
  8. Look for similarities between the three species
  9. Identify that species that is most unique
  10. Focus attention on how other species NOT included are similar and why
  11. Allow kids to build a chimera of animals from pieces and parts of other animals
  12. Use the construction paper and scissors to make ridiculous animal constructions
  13. Allow students to create stories about their crazy animal parts

Lesson: Basic Sanitation 101

Lesson: Basic Sanitation 101

Lesson: Basic Sanitation 101
Hand washing and Boots are must

This Lesson: Basic Sanitation 101 is a primer on how we keep humans and animals safe through basic sanitation.


Lesson: Water – Friend or Foe

Water – Friend or Foe

Testing Water from a pond, a tap, and a rain barrel

This lesson: Water – Friend or Foe students will be introduced to pathogens and benefits of water to different environments, ecologies, and species. They will compare and contrast water needs for plants, animals, and humans. They will discover how water purification actually works.


Lesson: Animal Holding Area

Lesson: Animal Holding Area

Portable Animal Holding Area Optimized for poultry

This lesson: Animal holding area is equal parts Vet Tech BioTech and BioEngineering. It requires students to brainstorm and collaborate to determine the best system to build that will safely house and secure animals. Consideration must be given to human entrance and egress as well as animal safety.


Lesson: Building a Mobile BioLab

Lesson: Building a Mobile BioLab

Building a Mobile BioLab

Students will need to have a place to hold, examine and manage animals while they are learning the basics. This lesson: Building a mobile BioLab encourages students to think through the items, tools, storage and holding tech they will need to safely handle animals. The chemical resistant white vinyl floor keeps everything clean and somewhat Sterile.

Materials

  • White Vinyl Tarp
  • Pop Up Tent (in case of weather)
  • Three holding cages
  • Tent Stakes
  • Power cord
  • Raspberry Pi Computer
  • 24″ Monitor
  • Portable Microscope
  • Portable Endoscope
  • Mobile VetTech Box
  • 2 Pans for washing
  • 4 towels for drying
  • Animal safety laminated sheets
  • Notepad
  • Pens or pencils
  • Gloves

Instructions

  1. Bring the BioLab box to the area to be deployed
  2. Deployable area must be at least 16′ square and have electrical access
  3. Stage caging and holding area

The Perfect Cover Crop for Unsightly Chain Link Fence

When we started building Mezzacello, we first needed to secure Mezzacello. The perimeter is 360 linear feet. The front elevation that fronts North 20th Street came pre-fenced with a wrought iron fence circa sometime in the 20th Century and still highly functional. The west elevation had a 36″ high and 70′ long chain link fence from late in the 20th Century. The west fence was missing a 10′ section, probably opening onto a driveway or garage at some point. Mezzacello was a property with some fences but with big missing gaps. Like a toothless insecure smile.

Our immediate problems were that people were driving their cars through the property. Homeless transients were pitching camp on the grounds. Drug addicts were using the bushes for getting high. Neighbors were walking (and relieving their dog’s waste) randomly through the yard. And most distressing and immediate, we had no security, privacy or safety from the south facing Broad Street elevation. Many times when we first moved in, we had people brazenly walk from the COTA (The local Bus line in Columbus, OH) bus stop (we called it the party stop) or from the run down “Chips-n-Go” gas station, across the parking lot to the south of the property and right into the yard to ask us for money or some of our food.

Now if another human soul ever asks me for food, they will get it. That is a baseline of human dignity. But if they ask me for money, they need to accept no, or be willing to work for it. The strangers walking across our yard (and through our plantings and visits with guests) were too erratic. We needed a barrier. We had a 150′ stretch that needed a fence. And a replacement 10′ span where the back gate once stood. Wrought iron was right out as it would have been too expensive. There was already a span of chain link on the western edge. Chain link it was.

For the past two years, Rick has been trying to conceal the chain link behind a cover of hearty Manhattan Euonymus which he has all been grown entirely from cuttings. He inherited the clippings from our neighbors on Miami Avenue to the west of us, Joshua Snyder-Hill and Steve Snyder-Hill. This method of propagating Euonymus was taught to us by our neighbor, Ms. Elizabeth Pryor. Sadly, Ms. Elizabeth passed away just last year. She was a great promoter of all things Mezzacello, and a great neighbor.

All the plants at Mezzacello are clones of those initial clippings (#AppliedSTEM). For the most part it has worked well. Each winter we run into a problem with euonymus dying because the lot attendants of the parking lot just to the south of us choose to pile all the snow onto our fence line and this kills the euonymus in the process. Rick is seriously considering planting some 6′ steel poles 4′ deep with 2′ sticking out (like you see at Walmart or Target to discourage people from driving their cars into the store front). But the city has rules about who can construct barriers right up on a city right-of-way…

So Rick just keeps plugging cuttings into the ground and I keep occasionally watering and fertilizing them. We do have one problem area. On the southwest corner of the lot, there was apparently a garage and an apron drive that emptied into Avon Alley. Nothing will grow back there with the exception of vines and scrub weeds. We may have to excavate that driveway at some point. Another project, another time.